Women Take the Lead at Eldridge Street

Women Take the Lead at Eldridge Street

In celebration of an upcoming anniversary at Eldridge, we’re reposting this blog post, originally written in February 2017 by Taylor Baker.  On this day, we remember the formation of the Ladies’ Auxiliary of the Eldridge Street Synagogue. Formed February 16, 1919, the all-female committee arose during a time of flux within the synagogue itself, and […]

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Why does the wall look like THAT?

Why does the wall look like THAT?

Gothamist has a great new series called WHY?, where they ask some burning questions about the people, places, and things of our city. Last week’s WHY? asked a question about Grand Central Terminal but the exact same question could have been asked in the sanctuary at the Museum at Eldridge Street – why is there […]

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Judith: Female Strength in Myth and Menorahs

Judith: Female Strength in Myth and Menorahs

This post was written by Museum intern Leena Zelman. As we are getting ready for our upcoming exhibition Lighting the World: Menorahs Around the Globe, we cannot help but notice the depiction of a female heroine on so many of these menorahs. As we pour over research on international Hanukah customs, and sort through the […]

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Griff Family Recipes for a Sweet New Year

Griff Family Recipes for a Sweet New Year

This post was adapted from a piece originally published in 2011. The Museum’s former Program Director, Hanna Griff-Sleven, not only cooked up great programs (including our signature Egg Rolls, Egg Creams, and Empanadas Festival!) but is a wonderful chef, too. In this post from 2011, she shares some delicious dessert recipes that will make your […]

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This Day in History: STRIKE!

This Day in History: STRIKE!

This post was written by Eva Brune. On September 4 in 1894, more than 12,000 New York area tailors – 4,000 from New York City alone — went on strike to protest the sweatshop conditions in which they had to work. Many of them Jewish from the Lower East Side, the workers struck to demand […]

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Chop Suey’s Un-birthday

Chop Suey’s Un-birthday

We like to use this blog as a place to mark moments in time that are important to our collective past and present. But it can also be important to take stock of what is not, along with what is. What moments are missing from our collective memory? Or, what histories are impossible to pin […]

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Once Home to Soldiers, Immigrants, and a Beluga Whale: The Remarkable Story of Battery Park’s Castle Clinton

Once Home to Soldiers, Immigrants, and a Beluga Whale: The Remarkable Story of Battery Park’s Castle Clinton

If you’ve ever had a picnic in Battery Park or taken a trip to the Statue of Liberty you’ve probably walked through Castle Clinton, a medieval-looking fortress dating back to 1808 that sits by the water’s edge. This structure, now used as a ticket office and information center for tourists heading to Liberty Island, has […]

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Comparing the Restoration of Two Lower Manhattan Historic Sites

Comparing the Restoration of Two Lower Manhattan Historic Sites

There are many things that make the Museum at Eldridge Street unique: the building’s remarkable history and distinctive location, breathtaking interior, and extraordinary restoration story. However, it is not the only impressive example of architectural restoration in Lower Manhattan. Another example, Trinity Church, has been part of New York’s history for more than 300 years; […]

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A Look into Jewish Mindfulness and Meditation

A Look into Jewish Mindfulness and Meditation

Today, many Jews who grapple with incorporating liturgical worship (also called davening) into their lives have turned instead to wordless, mindful meditation. With this practice, one can choose to reflect on God, on their place in the universe, or on something else entirely. These Jews, many in their early 20s or 30s, often grew up in […]

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