About Our Events

Egg Rolls, Egg Creams & Empanadas Festival Slideshow

Our annual block party, taking place every June, is a joyous cross-cultural celebration paying homage to the Jewish, Chinese and Puerto Rican communities of our neighborhood. Enjoy music, food, folk art demos and crafts, including klezmer and cantorial music, Chinese opera, Yiddish and Chinese lessons, mah jongg, scribal arts and more. Check out a photo gallery of all the amazing festival activities.


Lost & Found Music Series

The Museum at Eldridge Street's Lost & Found Music Series extends our preservation mission, presenting Jewish musical forms that are at risk of disappearing, and looks at the way Jewish music influences and draws inspiration from other cultural traditions.


The Morris Kaplan Scholar-in-Residence Program

The Museum;s landmark site has a long history as a place of Jewish learning. Join us for classes on the bible, Jewish history and culture, and memoir writing and genealogy. The Museum’s lifelong learning is funded, in part, by the Alice Lawrence Foundation.


Preservation Detectives Family Program

Binoculars? Check. Notepads? Check. Magnifying glasses? Check. Preservation Detectives, grab your tools and prepare for adventure. Step into a world filled with color, stories, and secrets. Climb stairs, count stars, open doors, even peek inside these 125 year old walls. Each month features a different theme, art project, and a new discovery.


Jane Jacobs Centennial Lecture Series

Presented with the Center for the Living City, this series celebrates the life and legacy of preservationist Jane Jacobs (1916-2006). In her work and in in influential book, The Death and Life of Great American Cities (1961), she argued that urban renewal did not respect the needs of most city dwellers.

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March 2017
NEW DATE: Tuesday, March 7 at 7 pm

Clairvoyant Housewives, Cookbook Mavens and Other Advice Givers – Lecture with Dr. Annie Polland

Dr. Annie Polland discusses the transition from Eastern European shtetls and cities to the crowded streets of the Lower East Side with a focus on Jewish immigrant women’s pivotal roles in both shaping their homes and New York’s growing economy. Polland is the Senior Vice President for Programs & Education at the Lower East Side Tenement Museum and the co- author, with Daniel Soyer, of City of Promises :Emerging Metropolis, winner of the National Jewish Book Award and  Landmark of the Spirit: The Eldridge Street Synagogue.

$14 adults; $10 students/seniors

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Sunday, March 5 at 3 pm

Parnuse: A Jewish Musical Legacy – Concert with Naum Goldenshteyn and Ensemble

German Goldenshteyn (1934-2006) has been described as “the closest thing the klezmer revival has to a Woody Guthrie or Lead Belly.” He came to the United States carrying a suitcase filled with his transcriptions of more than 900 rare melodies from Ukraine and his native Moldova, and transcribed an additional 200 tunes once here. Almost all of these musical pieces were previously unknown. At a concert in our magnificent sanctuary, his grand-nephew Naum Goldenshteyn and an ensemble of klezmer’s newest generation of performers will present a selection of these works. During the program, Naum Goldenshteyn will shares stories about his great-uncle.

$25 adults; $15 students and seniors

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On view through March 8, 2017

From the Blavatnik Archive – The Jewish Ghetto in Postcards: From Eastern Europe to the Lower East Side

In the early 20th century, the Lower East Side was the most crowded neighborhood in the world. Fleeing violent persecution, newly arrived immigrants from Eastern Europe recreated a familiar environment  of their previous homeland as they sought to establish new roots in America. Uniquely captured in postcards, the social media of the time, lively street scenes crowded with pickle vendors, pushcarts and horse-drawn carriages presented a stunning visual record of the “Jewish ghetto”in New York and shtetls and cities throughout Eastern Europe. In captivating color and stark black and white, an exhibition of original postcards from the Blavatnik Archive recall vanished places in the United States and Eastern Europe that are at the heart of the Jewish immigrant experience.

Included with Museum Admission

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Thursday, March 2 at 7 pm

OverConnected, InterWebbed (Or, How My Cellphone Hijacked My Life) – Story Slam with Reboot on our Analogue Selves

Harken back to the early 1900s when there were just smart people, not smartphones. In partnership with Reboot and in anticipation of the National Day of Unplugging on March 3-4, join us for a raucous evening of tale telling about your life (un)plugged in our very unplugged sanctuary. Share stories of emails you wish you had never sent, the sunset you experienced sans cellphone, tall tales of your digital addiction.  Actor Rachel Evans will emcee this evening of sharing.  Win a grand prize of a jar of pickles from the Pickle Guys for Best Story at the end of the evening.

$15 per person - includes a beer

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Thursday, March 23 at 7 pm

Art in Heaven – Film and Music with Z.S. Rosenfeld and Elie Massias

Filmmaker Z.S. Rosenfeld and award-winning musician Elie Massias team up to create a unique, immersive experience in our historic main sanctuary to complement our “Lost Synagogues of Europe” exhibition. Against the backdrop of Rosenfeld’s film of decaying synagogues in Europe, Massias will improvise and perform a haunting, real-time soundtrack with guitar, voice, saxophone, keyboard and looping recorder. This continuing film and musical project was born out of a trip Rosenfeld made to Europe to photograph the deteriorating structures of former synagogues. It became his mission to memorialize these once flourishing spiritual communities, and celebrate the artisans who built, carved and painted an array of unique prayer houses across Europe. Join Rosenfeld and Massias for a Q&A following the program.

$15 adults; $10 students and seniors

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February 2017
Sunday, February 26 at 2 pm

Jewish New York – Conversation & Reception

This round-table discussion on historic and cultural treasures of the Jewish Lower East Side features Niki Russ Federman, fourth generation co-owner of Russ & Daughters, Russ & Daughters Café and Russ & Daughters at the Jewish Museum; Alexandra Kelly, Manager of the New York Public Library’s Lower East Side oral history project; and filmmaker Casimir Nozkowski who will share his short film on the home he grew up in, a former synagogue on Hester Street. Paul Kaplan, author of Jewish New York, will moderate.

$14 adults; $10 students/seniors

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Thursday, February 23 from 6:30 to 8:30 pm

Secrets of the Synagogue: After Hours Tour – Presented with Untapped Cities

Tour our landmark sanctuary after hours and enjoy a wine reception. We’ll share historical secrets of our century old-synagogue, point out some of the building’s most surprising architectural details and hear from archivist Nancy Johnson, co-curator of The Jewish Ghetto in Postcards exhibition.

$30 per person

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Sunday, February 12 from 3 to 5 pm

Tenement Songs: Popular Music of the Jewish Immigrants

Ethnomusicologist Mark Slobin discusses the rise of Yiddish popular music in vaudeville dives, at the Yiddish theater and on parlor pianos in tenement homes during the era of mass migration to the United States.  Sing along as Miryem-Khaye Seigel, Lauren Brody and Jake Shulman-Ment bring this music to life.

$14 adults; $10 students/seniors

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Sunday, February 12 from 11 am to 1 pm

FOR FAMILIES – Pushcarts and Postcards: A Hot Cider Walking Tour

Before Snapchat, there were postcards! One hundred years ago, postcards were a wonderful way to share views of new places with friends and family – including images of the exotic Lower East Side! To celebrate our exhibit of historic postcards from the Blavatnik Archive, we’ll take to the streets and see what these local sites look like today. We’ll visit the spot where pushcarts reigned supreme and pickles were the original fast food. Along the way we’ll hear what immigrants and tourists alike thought of the “most crowded place on earth.” Afterwards warm up with hot cider and treats as we create our own postcards. Recommended for families with children ages 7 to 11.

$20 per family - Reservations Required

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January 2017
Monday, January 16 from 1 to 2:30 pm

This event is sold out. What’s Your Dream? Martin Luther King Jr. Day Family Program

The immigrants who built the Eldridge Street Synagogue crossed the ocean in search of freedom.  Martin Luther King, Jr. fought for justice and civil rights. Through their hopes, hard work, and dreams of a better life, our nation’s immigrants and Dr. King slowly changed the country and the world. Join us for Kobi Yamada’s beautiful book, What Do You Do With An Idea? We’ll listen to King’s famous speech and make art inspired by his ideas … and our own dreams.

Free Event, Donations Appreciated, Reservations Required!

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December 20162016
Wednedsay, December 28 at 1 pm

Hot Cider Walking Tour of the Lower East Side – Dec. 28

Take a tasty trip back in time to the early 20th century when the Lower East Side was home to the largest Jewish population in the world. This walking tour visits streets and sites featured in The Jewish Ghetto in Postcards exhibition, and includes a toasty tour of our landmark sanctuary, hot cider, and treats from The Pickle Guys and other local vendors.

$30 per person - Space is limited and RSVP is required. This tour will also be given on Monday, December 26.

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Tuesday, December 27 from 7 to 9 pm

Candlelight Tour and Soiree

We recreate the gas-lit interior of the synagogue’s early days to celebrate the fourth night of Chanukah – the Jewish Festival of Lights! Join us for a tour of the Eldridge Street Synagogue, including our new exhibition of Lower East Side postcards. Then enjoy a spread of wine and latkes, light the menorah, and share other holiday traditions.

$30 per person

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Tuesday, December 27 at 1 pm

Folklore of the Synagogue

Folklorist and the Museum’s Program Director Hanna Griff-Sleven shares stories about the Eldridge Street Synagogue and its early immigrant congregation, including a butcher, a banker, a boxer, and a mikvah operator. Afterward enjoy an old-school kiddush with herring, pumpernickel and a shot of slivovitz.

$14 adults; $10 students/seniors, includes Museum admission

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Monday, December 26 at 1 pm

Hot Cider Walking Tour of the Lower East Side – Dec. 26

Take a tasty trip back in time to the early 20th century when the Lower East Side was home to the largest Jewish population in the world. This walking tour visits streets and sites featured in The Jewish Ghetto in Postcards exhibition, and includes a toasty tour of our landmark sanctuary, hot cider, and treats from The Pickle Guys and other local vendors.

$30 per person - Space is limited and RSVP is required. This tour will also be given on Wednesday, December 28.

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Sunday, December 25 from 12 to 5 pm

Holiday Celebration on December 25

Looking for something fun to do on Christmas Day – also the second day of Chanukah? Visit a landmark synagogue in Chinatown! Join the Museum for tours, scavenger hunts, and an art activity (12-3 pm). At 3 pm, the Museum screens the 1925 silent film His People with an original score created and performed live by saxophonist Paul Shapiro and his sextet. Young and old will be on the edge of their seats, riveted by this century old story of a Lower East Side immigrant family. At 4:30 the Museum conducts a Chanukah candle-lighting ceremony.

$14 adults; $10 students/seniors; $6 children

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THURSDAY - November 3, 10, 17, December 1, 8, 15 & 22 from 11 am to 12:30 pm

Not Just the Weekly Torah Portion with Dr. Regina Stein

Bring your questions and opinions as we explore a variety of issues raised by the Torah portion each week incorporating both modern critical as well as traditional approaches to the biblical text. Knowledge of Hebrew and previous Torah study are not required.

$20 per class; $120 for all seven classes

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Our Wednesday, November 30 class has been cancelled. Class will resume on December 7, 14 & 21 from 11 am to 12:30 pm

The Good Good-Bye: On Death and Dying – With Rabbi Aviad Bodner

Explore the views and practices of the Jewish tradition on death and mourning, including end of life matters, burial and funeral customs, suicide, renting of garments, shiva practices and the Jewish view of the afterlife. Aviad Bodner is rabbi of the Stanton Street Shul on the Lower East Side.

$20 per class; $140 for all eight sessions

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TUESDAY - November 1, 8, 15, 22, 29, December 6, 13 & 20 from 11 am to 12:30 pm

King David: Adulterer, Murderer, Poet, Messiah – with Dr. Regina Stein

The story of King David is the richest, most robust and complex portrait of any character in the Hebrew Bible. As king and warrior David excels. But in his human relationships with his wives, children, and others, David’s behavior is often less than heroic. How does David become the eternal hero of the Jewish people? Why does Jewish tradition teach that the Messiah will be a descendent of King David? In the fall semester of this course we will discuss David’s relationships with both human beings and God as presented by the author of I-II Samuel. In the winter semester, we will explore David’s image as poet in the book of Psalms and the role assigned to him by the rabbis as the ancestor of the messiah and redeemer of…

$20 per class; $140 for all eight sessions

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Sunday, December 18 at 3 pm

Concert – The Fabulous Shpilkes

Trumpeter and vocalist Susan Watts commands a klezmer repertoire that is four-generations strong. Together with her mother, drummer Elaine Hoffman Watts, they will perform music written by Elaine’s grandfather in the Ukraine, her father in the United States, as well as their own more recent compositions.

$25 adults; $15 students and seniors

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Wednesday, December 14 at 7 pm

A Night with the Andy Statman Trio – Presented by the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation

Dubbed “a musician’s musician” by The New York Times, Andy Statman is one of the premier clarinetists and mandolinists playing today. Join him and his longtime partners Larry Eagle (percussion) and Jim Whitney (bass) for their trademark blend of American roots music, personal prayerful Hasidic music, klezmer, and avant-garde jazz.

$30 in advance; $45 at the door

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Monday, December 5 at 6:30 pm

Book Launch – Curating America by Richard Rabinowitz

Dr. Richard Rabinowitz, President of the American History Workshop, is one of the leading public historians in the United States with over 45 years of experience in creating news museums and exhibition on every aspect of American history and culture. Join us for a reception and remarks by the author to celebrate the publication of his new work Curating America: Journeys through Storyscapes of the American Past.  

Pay What You Wish

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LAST CLASS - Monday, December 5 at 11 am - Meets Off-Site

Before & Beyond the Lower East Side – With Urban Historian Barry Feldman

Urban historian Barry Feldman retuns to lead this 6-part class focusing on Jewish settlements before and after the iconic period of immigration to the Lower East Side. Classroom discussion of the Colonial Sephardic Community in lower Manhattan, the Grand Concourse in the Bronx and Harlem in the late 19th and early 20th centuries will alternate with 2-hour walking tours in those neighborhoods where we will admire former synagogues, boyhood homes of Jewish celebrities like Richard Rodgers and eclectic 19th-century architecture.

$20 per class; $100 for all six sessions

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Sunday, December 4 at 3 pm

Concert: Sacred Swing with the Eyal Vilner Big Band

By popular demand, Israeli-born composer and musician Eyal Vilner returns to Eldridge Street with his swinging sixteen-piece band. They will perform Vilner’s new compositions, original versions of jazz classics and music from the Big Band’s new project “Sacred Swinging Sounds.”

$25 adults; $15 students/seniors

Sponsored by Steven and Helene Walsey

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November 2016
On view through Thursday, December 1, 2016

Kaddish for Dabrowa Bialostocka – Exhibition by Mark Podwal

Eighteen new works in acrylic and colored pencil by artist Mark Podwalk inaugurate the Museum at Eldridge Street’s new Michael Weinstein Gallery. The featured works are inspired by the artist’s recent visit to Dabrowa Bialostocka, the shtetl in Poland where his mother was born. Although at one time Jews made up 78 percent of the town’s population, none remain today. Podwal describes the works as a “visual diary of my journey to Dabrowa.” The drawings are based on what he saw in town and what he heard from elderly residents as they reminisced about their former Jewish neighbors. Along with the exhibition, a documentary film about Dabrowa by Tomasz Wisniewski will be screened every day at 2 pm. The September 18 opening also celebrates the publication of Podwal’s new book,…

The exhibition is included with Museum admission which is $14 adults and $10 students/seniors

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Wednesday, November 30 at 6:30 pm

Jane Jacobs Centennial Lecture: Gary Hattem

Gary Hattem president of the Deutsche Bank Americas Foundation, Managing Director of their Community Development Finance Group, and a former community-based low-income housing developer, will speak on the legacy of writer and preservationist Jane Jacobs (1916-2006), whose work changed the way the world views and understands cities.  Award-winning author preservationist Roberta Brandes Gratz will introduce Hattem.

This event is free. RSVP requested.

Presented with the Center for the Living City.

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Monday, November 21 at 6:30 pm

Jane Jacobs Centennial Lecture: Janette Sadik-Khan

Janette Sadik-Khan, former NYC Department of Transportation Commissioner who introduced pedestrian plazas, bike lanes and bike sharing, will speak on the legacy of writer and preservationist Jane Jacobs (1916-2006), whose work changed the way the world views and understands cities.  Award-winning author and preservationist Roberta Brandes Gratz will introduce Sadik-Khan. (Please note that due to a scheduling conflict, this event has been moved from its original November 16 date, and will now take place on Monday, November 21.)

This event is free. RSVP requested.

Presented with the Center for the Living City.

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Sunday, November 20 at 3 pm

In Conversation: Edward Hirsch and Alec Wilkinson

When poet Edward Hirsch’s son died tragically, his friend, writer Alec Wilkinson, encouraged him to write through his grief. The result was Hirsch’s heartbreakingly beautiful book-length poem, Gabriel. Hirsch and Wilkinson will discuss the creation of this modern day elegy, written in the grip of the poet’s suffering.

$14 adults: $10 students and seniors

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Thursday, November 17 at 6:30 pm

After Hours Tour presented with Atlas Obscura

Find evidence of prayer, politicking, and even addiction in the Eldridge Street Synagogue, a dazzling, Moorish-style National Historic Landmark. The 1887 Eldridge Street Synagogue’s immigrant founders were anything but wizened old men. Most of the congregation’s leaders were in their 30s and 40s, savvy businessmen, and active in neighborhood affairs. Hear the stories of a banker, a butcher, a budding boxer and other characters who filled the pews.  Learn some Yiddish insults along the way.

$35 per person - Includes wine and refreshments

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Sunday, November 13 from 12 to 4 pm

Generation to Generation Festival

Travel back in time to 1886 when the cornerstone for the Eldridge Street Synagogue was laid. Music, art, food demos, and fun historical activities celebrate the building’s 130th anniversary and bring to life the transformative Jewish immigrant experience. Take a 19th-century citizenship test. Learn to make old-fashioned American pie. Take a photo at our old-fashioned photo booth. Hear performances of favorite 19th-century tunes.  Enjoy enactments of dramatic moments from the synagogue’s early history. Design your own time capsule and do some old-fashioned “homework.” Dressing in period garb is encouraged!

Pay what you wish

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Wednesday, November 9 at 6:30 pm

Jane Jacobs Centennial Lecture: Darren Walker

Darren Walker, President of the Ford Foundation, will speak on the legacy of writer and preservationist Jane Jacobs (1916-2006), whose work changed the way the world views and understands cities.  Award-winning author and preservationist Roberta Brandes Gratz will introduce Walker.

This event is free. RSVP required.

Presented with the Center for the Living City.

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Tuesday, November 8 from 1 to 2:30 pm

Presidents Don’t Have to Eat Vegetables – Election Day Family Program

As the country elects its 45th President, enjoy fun facts about Numbers 1 – 44! Join us for Judith St. George’s award-winning book, So You Want To Be President? Find out which Commander in Chief refused to eat broccoli and which one ate everything in sight! Discover who was the smallest president and who was SOOO big, he had to build a special bath tub. (And do you know who was President when the Eldridge Street Synagogue opened in 1887?) After the story, future voters ages 4-11 make patriotic crafts and cast a ballot in our own 2016 election.

Pay What You Wish

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October 2016
Sunday, October 30 at 3 pm

Micro Walking Tour of Eldridge Street – Presented with Untapped Cities

Travel the length of Eldridge Street, and you will discover tales of the immigrant experience, architectural triumph, and the realization of the American Dream alongside corruption and even murder. Join us as we walk the length of Eldridge Street and discover a former prison, a synagogue turned-artist studio, the first settlement house in America, and the War of 1812 story of our street’s namesake, Lieutenant Joseph C. Eldridge along with other neighborhood treasures.

$25 per person - Space is limited and RSVP is required

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THIS CLASS HAS BEEN CANCELLED

CANCELLED – What It Means to Be an Advocate – Class with Betsy Gotbaum

Learn how to make change and get things done! Former New York City Public Advocate Betsy Gotbaum describe where you can turn within and without city agencies to take action on issues both personal and public. Brainstorm with this seasoned activist on how to advocate for issues that are important to you.

$20 per class; $60 for all four sessions

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Thursday, October 27 at 6:30 pm

Borscht Belt – Book Launch with Photographer Marisa Scheinfeld

For much of the 20th century the Borscht Belt was a thriving vacation destination for the New York Jewish community.  By the 1980s and ‘90s, though, the region was in a state of rapid economic decline leading many of the hotels and clubs to close. For years Marisa Scheinfeld, a Catskills native, photographed the abandoned hotels of the area capturing their haunting and at times eerily beautiful state of decline. The result is now the subject of a new coffee table book, Borscht Belt: Revisiting the Remains of America’s Jewish Vacationland (Cornell University, 2016). Join us for a reception and remarks by the author.

This event is co-present with the Lower East Side Jewish Conservancy

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Thursday, October 20 from 6 to 9 pm

Sukkot Party at the City Reliquary

For this month’s After Hours, we head to Williamsburg, Brooklyn where the City Reliquary has created a unique, handcrafted sukkah, the temporary hut where meals are eaten during the Jewish holiday of Sukkot. We’ll enjoy wine and snacks under the stars!  Whether you have ever celebrated Sukkot or not, join us as we sample etrog liqueur,  unplug and learn about holiday traditions with Reboot, and tour the City Reliquary’s delightfully eccentric collection of NYC ephemera. The City Reliquary was designated one of New York City’s 10 Best Small Museums by Conde Nast Traveler.

$15 per person - Includes wine and refreshments

This event takes place at City Reliquary, 370 Metropolitan Avenue in Williamsburg, Brooklyn

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Sunday, October 16 from 10 am to 3 pm

Open House New York

The Museum’s landmark home is a featured site of Open House New York, America’s largest architecture and design event.  We are offering free synagogue tours that tell the story of our magnificent 1887 National Historic Landmark, the first great house of worship built in America by Jewish immigrants from Eastern Europe. Half-hour tours offered at 10, 10:30, 11, 11:30, 1, 1:30, 2 and 2:30. A self-guided scavenger hunt and rose window art activity are offered throughout the day for families.

This is a free event.

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Monday, October 10 at 10:45 am

Columbus Day Walking Tour – Shuls of Grandeur

Join us on Columbus Day for an exploration of the Lower East Side’s most historic synagogues. Visit Bialystoker Synagogue, the largest active congregation on the Lower East Side today; Beth Hamedrash Hagadol, the nation’s oldest Orthodox Jewish Russian congregation; and our home and a magnificent National Historic Landmark, the Eldridge Street Synagogue. We’ll also stop at other historic sites and modern day eateries, including Educational Alliance, Henry Street Settlement, Seward Park, and The Pickle Guys.    

$24 per person

Co-presented with the Lower East Side Jewish Conservancy

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Sunday, October 9 from 11 am to 12:30 pm

Raise the Roof at the Reliquary! Family Sukkot Program

This Sukkot, we’re teaming up with the City Reliquary museum in Brooklyn and heading to their backyard for a special holiday program. A reliquary is a container for relics and sure enough, the City Reliquary is overflowing with vintage subway signs, neon lights, and other New York treasures! Explore their amazing collections as we snack, celebrate and decorate a Sukkah with our own original crafts.  

Pay what you wish, for ages 4-11

This program takes place at the City Reliquary in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, 370 Metropolitan Avenue.

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Thursday, October 6, at 6:30 pm

Jane Jacobs Centennial Lecture: Peter Laurence & Robert Kanigel

Peter Laurence, author of Becoming Jane Jacobs, and Robert Kanigel, author of the upcoming book Eyes on the Street: The Life of Jane Jacobs, will speak on the legacy of writer and preservationist Ms. Jacobs (1916-2006), whose work changed the way the world views and understands cities.  Award-winning author and preservationist Roberta Brandes Gratz will introduce Laurence and Kanigel.

This event is free. RSVP requested.

Presented with the Center for the Living City.

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Wednesday, October 5 from 6:30 to 8:30 pm

The Gilded Age in New York – Book Launch with Esther Crain

It’s hard to imagine an era in New York’s past more transformative than the Gilded Age. In 1866, New York’s population of just over 800,000 was concentrated below 23rd Street. By 1900, new arrivals from across the world helped push the population to three million. Electric lights bathed parks and sidewalks in a brilliant nighttime glow. Steel office towers skimmed the heavens, and a graceful bridge united the greater metropolis. Join Esther Crain, author of the new release The Gilded Age in New York, 1870-1910 (Hachette Book Group, 2016), and the writer behind the website Ephemeral New York, for a reading and Q &A. She’ll explore what day-to-day life was like for New Yorkers in an age of incredible wealth, deep poverty, political corruption, invention, ingenuity, and rapid social change.

Pay What You Wish

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September 2016
Wednesday, September 28 at 6:30 pm

Jane Jacobs Centennial Lecture: Adam Gopnik

Adam Gopnik, staff writer for The New Yorker and author, will speak on the legacy of writer and preservationist Jane Jacobs (1916-2006), whose work changed the way the world views and understands cities.  Award-winning author and preservationist Roberta Brandes Gratz will introduce Gopnik.

This event is free. RSVP requested.

Presented with the Center for the Living City

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Sunday, September 25 at 3 pm

Person Place Thing: Live Taping with Patricia Marx and Randy Cohen

Join Patricia Marx, humorist and writer, in conversation with Randy Cohen, author and original writer of “The Ethicist” for the New York Times Magazine.  This program will be a live taping of Person Place Thing with Randy Cohen, an interview show based on the idea that people are particularly engaging when they speak not directly about themselves but about something they care about. Marx will talk about one person and one place, and then select one thing drawn from the Museum at Eldridge Street’s collection that is important to her.

$14 adults; $10 students and seniors

Ticket includes Museum admission

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Sunday, September 25 at 11 am

Back by Popular Demand: All of a Kind Family Walking Tour

Prepare for Rosh HaShana like it’s 1916! Due to overwhelming demand, we’re adding a special All of a Kind Family Walking Tour for the Jewish New Year. Join us as we stroll through the stories and onto the streets where Ella, Henny, Sarah, Gertie, and Charlotte shopped, played, and of course, went to the library.  We’ll make a holiday stop on Shtiebel Row and pick up some timeless treats for the New Year.

$20 per family; for ages 4-12

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THIS EVENT HAS BEEN CANCELLED

From Cradle to the Grave – After Hours Tour

This event has been cancelled.

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Wednesday, September 14 at 6:30 pm

SOLD OUT – Jane Jacobs Centennial Lecture: Paul Goldberger

Paul Goldberger, Pulitzer Prize winning architecture critic and author, will speak on the legacy of writer and preservationist Jane Jacobs (1916-2006), whose work changed the way the world views and understands cities.  Award-winning author and preservationist Roberta Brandes Gratz will introduce Goldberger.

This event is free. RSVP requested.

Presented with the Center for the Living City

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Thursday, September 8 at 7 pm

Cantorial Jam with Cantors Jack and Daniel Mendelson

During the Golden Age of Cantorial Music many Jewish liturgical singers were fans of jazz, just as jazz artists were often devotees of the cantorial art. Renowned father and son duo, Cantors Jack and Daniel Mendelson, and jazz pianist Anthony Coleman join forces to celebrate the unique fusion of these two celebrated and complementary art forms. They present a “cantorial jam” in our magnificent sanctuary, once home to renowned cantors of the early twentieth century.

$25 adults; $15 students/seniors

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Tuesday, September 6 from 6:30 to 8:30 pm

Mamaleh Knows Best – Launch Party with Author Marjorie Ingall

Celebrate the publication of author and Table Magazine columnist Marjorie Ingall’s Mamaleh Knows Best. Blending personal anecdotes, humor, historical texts, and scientific research, Ingall shares Jewish secrets for raising self-sufficient, ethical and accomplished children. With good sense, compassion and plenty of humor, she smashes the stereotype of the Jewish mother as hectoring, guilt-inducing, and clingy as a limpet. Enjoy wine, refreshments, and remarks by the author.

Pay What You Wish

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August 2016
Thursday, August 18 at 7 pm

Wine and White Linen: Concert with Orphan Jane

Gypsy cabaret band Orphan Jane inaugurates our first-ever celebration of Tu B’Av, a traditional night of love and revelry marking the grape harvest. The band performs both original songs infused with their signature blend of Eastern European circus blues as well as vaudeville hits from the golden age of Yiddish theatre. Five dollars off the ticket price for those who wear their summer whites.  

$25 adults; $15 students and seniors. Five dollars off the ticket price for those who wear their summer whites.

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Thursday, August 11 at 6:30 PM

After Hours – Wine and Forensic Architecture

If these walls could talk.  On this intimate evening tour we discover that our 1887 building does have an incredible story to tell! Enjoy a glass of wine and then investigate hidden designs in the building’s hand-painted walls and ceiling; learn why a 19th century Torah ark depicts wooden hands in the shape of the Vulcan Salute; sniff out a hidden compartment in the reader’s platform; and enjoy refreshments along the way.

$30 per person

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Thursday, August 11 from 11 am to 12:30 pm

Tisha B’Av and Jewish Martyrdom with Dr. Regina Stein

The 9th of Av commemorates the destruction of both the First and Second Temples in Jerusalem.  In preparation for this day of mourning, we will explore the topic of Jewish martyrdom, its origins and significance in various times and places.

$14 adults; $10 students and seniors

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Sunday, August 7 at 11 am

All of a Kind Family Walking Tour – SOLD OUT

What did Gertie and Charlotte buy at the candy store? Why did Henny have to stay after school? Where did the five sisters go every Friday? See for yourself as we bring Sydney Taylor’s beloved All of a Kind Family to life! Stroll through the story and onto the streets where the girls lived, played, and went to school a century ago. Along the way, taste pickles from a barrel and shop for treats in an old fashioned candy store.

$20 per family, for ages 4-11

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Wednesday, August 3 at 6:30 pm

Book Talk: Brenda Janowitz &Susan Shapiro, moderated by Judy Batalion

In an evening book talk that promises to be thought-provoking, funny and moving, authors Brenda Janowitz and Susan Shapiro talk with moderator Judy Batalion about the inspiration for their books, Jewish identity, and more. Batalion is the author of White Walls: A Memoir about Motherhood, Daughterhood and the Mess in Between.  In Janowitz’s The Dinner Party, a Passover seder goes hilariously wrong.   Shapiro’s witty What’s Never Said considers the subject of the one who got away.  Books by all three authors will be available for purchase and signing.  Doors open at 6:30, talk at 7 pm.  

Pay what you wish

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July 2016
Sunday, July 24 from 8 am to 7 pm

Summer Trip to the Yiddish Book Center

Join us for a visit to the Yiddish Book Center in Amherst, Massachusetts. The  summer trip includes transportation, kosher lunch and snacks, and a special guided tour of the Center’s architecturally unique building,  designed to recall a shtetl—the iconic Jewish town of Eastern Europe— and set on the grounds of a scenic apple orchard in Amherst, Massachusetts. Our guided tour of the Center’s permanent and visiting exhibits will introduce you to Yiddish literature and culture, and the glory days of the Yiddish media through clips from classic Yiddish films, recordings of vintage Yiddish radio programs, and newspaper clippings and authentic pressroom equipment in the Yiddish print shop. In other exhibits, you’ll explore the world of rural Jews in pre-war eastern Europe; meet three immigrant families through their personal stories, pictures, and other artifacts; and…

$150, includes transportation, kosher lunch, snack and tour.

Meet at 8 am in front of the NY Public Library, Fifth Avenue and 41st Street

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Thursday, July 21 at 6:30 pm

After Hours: Micro Walking Tour of Eldridge Street

Every city block tells a story, and on Eldridge Street you can hear intriguing tales of the immigrant experience, architectural triumphs, and the realization of the American Dream alongside corruption and even murder. Join us as we walk the length of Eldridge Street and discover a prison, a synagogue turned-artist studio, a settlement house and our street’s namesake, Lieutenant Joseph Eldridge, and his War of 1812 story. Afterwards enjoy wine and refreshments in our majestic main sanctuary.

$30 per person

Photo: dr osmosis

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Wednesday, July 20 at 7 pm

Person Place Thing: Live Taping with Paul Rudnick and Randy Cohen

Join Paul Rudnick, writer and essayist, in conversation with Randy Cohen, author, humorist and original writer of “The Ethicist” for the New York Times Magazine.  This program will be a live-taping of Person Place Thing with Randy Cohen, an interview show based on this idea:  people are particularly engaging when they speak not directly about themselves but about something they care about. Rudnick will talk about one person, one place, and one thing drawn from the Museum at Eldridge Street’s collection that is important to him.

$14 adults; $10 students and seniors

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Sunday, July 17 from 11 am to 12:30 pm

The Keeping Quilt: Stories, Art, and Clues to the Past

Make new memories this summer! Visit the Museum at Eldridge Street, housed in a beautiful and historic synagogue on New York City’s Lower East Side.  Here you’ll enjoy story time and art as we read The Keeping Quilt, Patricia Polacco’s beloved book about family and tradition. Then follow century old clues around the Eldridge Street Synagogue and discover this landmark’s own fascinating past. Put it all together and create memorable art….and a brand new tradition. This event is presented in partnership with the Jewish Book Council.

$20 per family, for ages 4-11
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This event is presented with the Jewish Book Council

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Thursday, July 14 at 7 pm

Dan Rose Quartet

Enjoy an evening of jazz favorites from the Great American songbook in our beautiful main sanctuary. Guitarist Dan Rose will be joined by Bill Crow (bass); Harvey Kaiser (saxophone); and Steve Little (drums). Between them, this distinguished group of musicians has played and recorded with Lionel Hampton, Duke Ellington, Dave Brubeck, Gerry Mulligan, Benny Goodman, Stan Getz, Marian McPartland, Joan Baez, Josephine Baker, Sarah Vaughan, Cab Calloway, and more. Their repertoire includes works by Jewish American songwriters George and Ira Gershwin, Lerner & Loewe and more. Includes a wine reception.

$25 adults; $15 students and seniors

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Wednesday, July 13 at 6:30 pm

Jane Jacobs Centennial Lecture: Ronald Shiffman, Mindy Thompson Fullilove & Sandy Ikeda

A panel including Ronald Shiffman (planner, architect and NYC community development leader), Mindy Thompson Fullilove (psychiatrist interested in the links between the environment and mental health), and Sandy Ikeda (Professor of Economics at Purchase College), will speak on the legacy of writer and preservationist Jane Jacobs (1916-2006), whose work changed the way the world views and understands cities.  Award-winning author and preservationist Roberta Brandes Gratz will introduce the group.

This event is free. RSVP requested.

Presented with the Center for the Living City. Sponsored by the Pratt Center for Community Development.

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June 2016
Wednesday, June 29 from 11 am to 12:30 pm

How to Advocate for Yourself in the World

There are many definitions of the word advocate and hundreds of advocacy groups. As former Public Advocate of the city of New York, Betsy Gotbaum will describe how she interprets the role of this position, what were the important issues she confronted and where people can turn to within and without city agencies when confronted with a myriad of problems She will give examples of problems and issues, and ask the class to share their own experiences with advocacy.  

$20 for class - Pay on Arrival

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Sunday, June 26 at 3 pm

Talk and Music: The Early Life of Irving Berlin

Composer and musician Irving Berlin was born in 1888 in Belarus, the son of a synagogue cantor. With his family he fled to New York via Antwerp’s Red Star Line to escape the anti-semitic pogroms. Like so many other immigrant families in the late 19th century, they settled on the Lower East Side. Ted Chapin, President and Chief Creative Officer of Rodgers & Hammerstein, and Red Star Line historian Bram Beelaert explore Berlin‘s early life and work. Cast members from HOLIDAY INN, the new Irving Berlin musical opening on Broadway this fall, present Berlin‘s vaudeville and Yiddish songs influenced by his experience growing up on the Lower East Side.

$16 adults; $12 students and seniors

Presented with Flanders House, Rodgers and Hammerstein and Roundabout Theatre Company

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Thursday, June 23 from 6:30 to 8:30 pm

After Hours: Treasures of the Archives

A ceramic spittoon, a hand-embroidered silk ark cover made from a curtain, and a mysterious glass container holding a pile of ashes. Hear the human stories behind secular and sacred artifacts in the Museum’s collection on this behind-the-scenes tour of the Eldridge Street Synagogue. You’ll also get to see some very special Lower East Side objects brought over from the City Reliquary’s collection that recall the neighborhood’s Jewish immigrant past. As with all of our After Hours events, there will be time to mingle and explore our permanent exhibition with wine and a nosh.

$30 per person

Presented with the City Reliquary Museum

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Sunday, June 19 from noon to 4 pm

Egg Rolls, Egg Creams and Empanadas Festival

Celebrate the Jewish, Chinese and Puerto Rican communities of the Museum’s Lower East Side/Chinatown neighborhood at the Museum’s free annual block party.  What to expect? Lots of fun, including klezmer, cantorial, Peking opera, bomba and plena music; Hebrew and Chinese scribal art, yarmulke making, Chinese and Puerto Rican mask making; games of Mah Jongg; and community arts and crafts. Kosher egg rolls, egg creams, empanadas and other tasty traditional foods will be for sale!

This event is free

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Wednesday, June 15 at 6:30 pm

Jane Jacobs Centennial Lecture – Elizabeth Barlow Rogers

Landscape designer and preservationist Elizabeth Barlow Rogers will speak about the legacy of author and preservationist Jane Jacobs (1916-2006) whose work changed the way the world views and understands cities. Award-winning author and preservationist Roberta Brandes Gratz will introduce Rogers.

Pay what you wish.

Presented with the Center for the Living City and the Central Park Conservancy

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May 2016
Thursday, May 26 at 7 pm

Concert: Yiddish and Chinese Folk Music with Hot Pstromi and the EastRiver Ensemble

Presenting a mash-up of Chinese and Yiddish folk music traditions! In this joyous concert, violinist Yale Strom’s Hot Pstromi and the EastRiver Ensemble explore the historical and musical connections between the Russian Jews and Chinese who lived together in Harbin, China from the turn of the twentieth century through World War II.

$25 adults; $15 students and seniors

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Sunday, May 15 at 3 pm

Yiddish Culture in the Age of the Start-Up

Yiddish is often seen as dying. But the last decade has seen a younger, secular generation of Yiddish lovers launch websites, start and reform organizations, and even found a Yiddish-speaking organic farm. Who are these new Yiddishists? What, if anything, defines Yiddish culture in the age of the start-up? This panel brings together prominent scholars and activists of New Yiddishism: Sarah Zarrow, managing editor of In geveb: A Journal of Yiddish Studies; Sandy Fox, doctoral candidate at NYU; Ross Perlin, of the Endangered Language Alliance; Dmitri Zisl Slepovich, ethnomusicologist and leader of the band Litvakus; and Eitan Kensky of the Yiddish Book Center who will moderate.

$12 adults; $10 students and seniors

Co-sponsored with the Yiddish Book Center

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Sunday, May 15 from 11 am to 12:30 pm

Sold out! All of a Kind Family Walking Tour

Enchanting young readers for generations, All of a Kind Family tells the story of five sisters growing up on the Lower East Side a century ago. Stroll through the story and onto the streets as we bring Sydney Taylor’s beloved novel to life. Along the way, taste pickles from a barrel and shop for treats in an old fashioned candy store!

$20 per family - includes 2 adults and up to 3 children

For ages 4-11

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Thursday, May 12, 19 & 26 from 11 am to 12:30 pm

Not Just the Weekly Torah Portion with Dr. Regina Stein – Spring Session

Bring your questions and opinions as we explore a variety of issues raised by the Torah portion each week. Knowledge of Hebrew and previous Torah study are not required. You can attend one class or the whole spring series.

$20 per class

This class is part of our Morris Kaplan Scholar in Residence Program.

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Tuesday, May 10 at 7 pm

Book Talk with Lynda Cohen Loigman & Jennifer S. Brown

Authors Lynda Cohen Loigman and Jennifer S. Brown will discuss their debut historical novels, The Two-Family House and Modern Girls. Both novels follow the lives of Jewish families living in New York. In Loigman’s morally complex debut, The Two-Family House, closely bonded sisters-in-law living in Brooklyn with their husbands and families struggle through a lifetime of consequences that stem from choices made on the evening of a 1947 blizzard and a shocking family secret. Brown’s Modern Girls takes place in 1935, in the Jewish community of the Lower East Side, where an immigrant mother and her unmarried daughter both find themselves pregnant and forced to make impossible choices that will challenge their beliefs, betray their traditions, and upset the very world they live in. The authors will discuss the real-life inspirations and research behind their stories,…

Pay what you wish

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Tuesday mornings, May 10, 17 & 24 - From 11 am to 12:30 pm

Jews and Christians: The Early Years – Semester II

The life and teachings of Jesus came to be interpreted and revised by his disciples—most significantly by Paul. What were the issues over which Paul and the other disciples disagreed? How did these disagreements affect the development of what came to be called Christianity? What impact did these developments have on the Rabbinic Judaism which was flowering at the same time? When and why did Jews and Christians come to a parting of the ways? These are some of the questions we will explore as we analyze a variety of sources that paint very different portraits of these movements from the late 1st through the 6th centuries. This class continues the discussion begun in Jews & Christians Semester I, during the fall of 2015.

$20 for each session

This class is part of our Morris Kaplan Scholar in Residence Program

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Sunday, May 8 from 11 am to 1 pm

Balabustas! A Mother’s Day Walking Tour – SOLD OUT

For Mother’s Day, explore Jewish women’s history of the Lower East Side. We’ll begin with a mimosa toast in the historic dining in the Henry Street Settlement where we will hear about our first Lower East Side heroine, Lillian Wald, in the historic dining room in the Henry Street Settlement. Then follow in the footsteps of generations of neighborhood women, discovering synagogues, shops, settlement houses, a mikvah, and even a red light district. We’ll end with a tour and a light brunch at the Museum at Eldridge Street.

$35 per person; includes a mimosa toast and light brunch

Co-presented with the Lower East Side Jewish Conservancy.

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Wednesday, May 4 at 6:30 pm

Jane Jacobs Centennial Lecture: Ray Suarez

Ray Suarez, broadcast journalist and author of three books including The Old Neighborhood: What We Lost in the Great Suburban Migration, will speak on the legacy of writer and preservationist Jane Jacobs (1916-2006), whose work changed the way the world views and understands cities.  Award-winning author and preservationist Roberta Brandes Gratz will introduce Suarez.  Note: Michael Kimmelman, who was originally scheduled for this date, will speak later in the series.

Pay what you wish

Presented with the Center for the Living City

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April 2016
Mon. April 25, Tues. April 26, Wed. April 27 from 10 am to 5 pm; Thurs. April 28 from 10 am to 3 pm

Matzo Tours of the Eldridge Street Synagogue

During Passover week, enjoy Matzo Tours of our magnificent landmark site, the Eldridge Street Synagogue. Built in 1887, the Eldridge Street Synagogue is the first great house of worship built in America by Jewish immigrants from Eastern Europe. Learn about its history, architecture and restoration. Then enjoy a nosh of matzo and other kosher-for-Passover treats courtesy of Streit’s Matzo. Self-guided scavenger hunts and coloring pages are available for families. RSVP is not required.

$14 adults; $10 students and seniors; $8 children 5-17; Free for children under 5 years of age

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Sunday, April 17 at 3 pm

Concert: I am for My Beloved, A Concert of Jewish Classical Music with Allison Charney & Arts Ahimsa

This beautiful concert on the theme of love and peace features acclaimed soprano Allison Charney, violinist Laura Jean Goldberg, the Arts Ahimsa Chamber Ensemble, and veteran actor Jordan Charney. They will premiere gloriously uplifting music by NYC-based composers, Kim D. Sherman and Moshe S. Knoll, including a string quartet piece inspired by the hometown of Eldridge Street Synagogue’s founding Rabbi, Abraham Aaron Yudelovitch.

$25 adults; $15 students and seniors

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Sunday, April 17 from 11 am to 1 pm

Matzo Madness!

Prizes, surprises, and plagues so sweet, they won’t scare anyone away! Don’t miss Matzo Madness at Eldridge Street! Make marshmallow plagues, Passover puppets, and track down clues on a holiday scavenger hunt. Belt out zany Passover songs with actress Kathleen Fletcher and even win a Lower East Side gift basket stuffed with treats from Economy Candy,  Kossar’s, AND The Pickle Guys. All this plus children’s author Yona Zeldis McDonough. Now that’s Dayenu! Reservations are required.

$20 per family - includes 2 adults and up to 3 children.

For ages 4-11

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Wednesday, April 13 at 7 pm

Concert: Herencia Judia with Benjamin Lapidus

Guitarist Ben Lapidus and Herencia Judía – featuring Jorge Bringas, Manuel Alejandro Carro, Cantor Samuel Levine, Onel Mulet, and Felix Sanabria – present an exciting Afro-Latin take on Jewish liturgy. Listeners will enjoy a joyous musical and spiritual journey, and discover surprising connections between a variety of Spanish Caribbean traditions and Jewish liturgy. Along the way, the group explores the music of Jewish holidays and daily prayers as well as a wide range of Afro-Latin genres like bomba, plena, son, changüí, comparsa, danzón, and the Yoruba traditions of Cuba.

$25 adults; $15 students and seniors

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Sunay, April 10 at 10:45 am

Pre-Passover Nosh & Stroll – SOLD OUT

This tasty tour starts at the Bialystoker Synagogue, where we’ll ooh and aah over its Tiffany inspired stained glass and zodiac murals. From there we’ll visit Beth Hamedrash Hagadol and other sites of Jewish significance on the Lower East Side. To get you ready for Passover, we’ll stop by The Pickle Guys where they will be preparing horseradish for the holiday, and end at our landmark site, the 1887 Eldridge Street Synagogue, for a delicious nosh and talk from our friends at Streit’s Matzos.

$28 per person, includes a nosh and meets in front of Bialystoker Synagogue, 7-11 Bialystoker Place/Willett Street

Co-sponsored with the Lower East Side Jewish Conservancy. Thanks to Streit’s Matzos for their kosher food donation.

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Thursday, April 7 at 7 pm

Yearning to Breathe Free: The American Jewish Response to the Refugee Crisis

At this important round-table event, speakers from HIAS (Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society), the American Jewish Historical Society, and newly settled refugees discuss the refugee crisis and the American Jewish response.

$12 adults; $10 students and seniors

Co-presented with The Anne Frank Center USA and the American Jewish Historical Society.
Photo: SCNS.com

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Tuesday, April 5 from 6:30 to 8 pm

Book Launch: Stars in the Ring with Mike Silver

Relive an era when fabulous boxers named “Slapsie Maxie” Rosenbloom, Ruby Goldstein (“The Jewel of the Ghetto”), and Leach Cross (“The Fighting Dentist”), literally fought their way out of poverty to become instant heroes to a generation struggling to enter the social and economic mainstream at this reception, lecture, and book signing celebrating the publication of historian Mike Silver’s “Stars in the Ring: Jewish Champions in the Golden Age of Boxing” (Lyons Press).

Pay what you wish

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March 2016
Monday mornings, March 7, 14, 21, and 28 from 11 am to 12:30 pm

The Mapping and Making of Brooklyn

There has always been a mystique about Brooklyn: its distinctive speech patterns, ethnic neighborhoods, feisty attitudes, cultural institutions and the Dodgers. The borough’s recent renaissance suggests Brooklyn’s popularity will extend well into the twenty-first century. This four-session class will map Brooklyn’s history from the colonial period to the present, and explore its diverse neighborhoods and demographics, cultural institutions and famous personalities.  Vibrant class participation, nostalgia, memories and items of material culture are encouraged.

$75 for the four-session class - THIS EVENT IS SOLD OUT

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Wednesday, March 30 at 7 pm

Concert: Jewish Folk and Cafe Music with Deborah Karpel and Ismail Butera

In this lively concert, musical duo Deborah Karpel (vocals) and Ismail Butera (accordion) perform folk and café melodies that emerged from diverse Jewish immigrant communities, including Yiddish, Sephardic, Eastern European and American Jewish. They will be accompanied by friends Rima Fand (violin) and David Hofstra (bass).

$25 adults; $15 students and seniors

Co-sponsored with Kehila Kedosha Janina Synagogue and Museum.

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Tuesday, March 29 - Doors Open at 6:30 pm

Book Launch: Don’t Let My Baby Do Rodeo with Boris Fishman

Join us for a reading and wine reception celebrating the publication of author Boris Fishman’s moving and often hilarious second novel Don’t Let My Baby Do Rodeo (Harper Collins, 2016), about Russian-Jewish immigrants in New Jersey who adopt a boy from Montana who turns out to be wild. Looking for answers, the family goes west for the first time in their American lives, but it’s the parents who are forever transformed when they finally meet their adopted country.

Pay what you wish - This event is co-sponsored by the Russian American Cultural Center

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Wednesday, March 16 at 7 pm

Talk: Remembering the Women of the Triangle Fire with Debbie Wells

Annie Nicholas, an eighteen-year-old Russian Jewish immigrant, worked as a button-maker at the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory. Tragically on March 25, 1911, she and 145 other workers – mainly Italian and Jewish young women – died as a fire broke out on the factory floors. Debbie Wells, Co-Founder and Partner of Artful Circle, relates the story of her husband’s family who are descendants of Annie Nicholas, and traces how the 1911 Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire sparked the rise of the labor union movement and fire safety regulations in America.

Pay what you wish

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Sunday, March 13 at 3 pm

Concert: The Jewish Music of Provence with Eleonore Weill, Pete Rushefsky, Jake Shulman-Ment & Jordan Morton

This quartet of celebrated klezmer musicians delves into the lost corners of the Yiddish-speaking communities of Europe and discovers a treasure trove of Judéo-Provençal songs.  Enjoy beautiful melodies from Romania, Moldova, Ukraine and France with Eléonore Weill (wooden flutes, vocals), Pete Rushefsky (tsimbl), Jake Shulman-Ment (violin) and Jordan Morton (bass).

$25 adults; $15 students and seniors

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Thursday, March 10 from 6:30 to 8:30 pm

After Hours: Beyond the Facade Art and Architecture Tour

Discover the synagogue’s most surprising features while enjoying a glass of wine and good company. See if you can detect what is original and what is restored. Learn about the building’s newest element, a contemporary stained-glass artwork by artist Kiki Smith and architect Deborah Gans.

$30 per person - Co-sponsored with Brooklyn Brainery

Photo by Kate Milford

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February 2016
Sunday, February 28 at 3 pm

Concert: Afro-Semitic Experience with Warren Byrd and David Chevan

This seven-piece ensemble celebrates an auspicious anniversary — chai, or eighteen, years together playing their trademark blend of Jewish and African American musical traditions.  This event celebrates Black History Month.

$20 adults; $15 students/seniors; includes Museum admission

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Sunday, February 28 from 11 am to 1 pm

The Keeping Quilt: Stories, Art and Clues to the Past

  A shirt, a nightdress, a babushka, and an old apron, are stitched together in Patricia Polacco’s The Keeping Quilt to create a quilt of memories – and a tradition – that is passed down from generation to generation for more than a century. Come hear this beautiful, award winning story, then follow clues around the historic Eldridge Street Synagogue. Discover the fascinating memories that have been passed down here for 128 years. After that, join Artist Sharon Gross and create your own artistic traditions.

$15 per family. For ages 4-11 and their families.

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Friday, February 26 from 11 am to 1 pm

Open House for Photographers and Artists

Budding and professional photographers and artists: Come armed with your camera or sketchbook and let our beautiful sanctuary inspire you  Admission for you is free.  We ask that you share a digital file of your photographs and drawings with us via email or on Instagram.

Free. Registration required.

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Thursday, February 25 from 6:30 to 8:30 pm

After Hours Tour and Wine Reception

Enjoy our landmark in a relaxed and intimate setting – and with a glass of wine! On this special evening tour you’ll explore the Eldridge Street Synagogue from bottom to top and learn about its breathtaking restoration.

$35 per person

Co-sponsored with Atlas Obscura.

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Tuesday, February 9 from 6:30 to 8 pm

Book Launch: How Come Boys Get to Keep Their Noses with author Tahneer Oksman

Join us for a reception celebrating the publication of Tahneer Oksman’s book of literary criticism, “‘How Come Boys Get to Keep Their Noses?’ Women and Jewish American Identity in Contemporary Graphic Memoirs” (Columbia University Press, 2016). Focusing on the work of graphic novelists and cartoonists Aline Kominsky Crumb, Vanessa Davis, Miss Lasko-Gross, Lauren Weinstein, Sarah Glidden, Miriam Libicki, and Liana Finck, Oksman connects innovations in graphic storytelling with the contradictory, ambiguous figurations of the Jewish self in the postmodern era.    Tahneer Oksman is assistant professor and director of the Writing Program at Marymount Manhattan College.

Free Admission

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Offered Thursday, February 4, 11, 18, 25 from 11 am to 12:30 pm

Not Just the Weekly Torah Portion with Dr. Regina Stein – Winter Session

Bring your questions and opinions as we explore a variety of issues raised by the Torah portion each week. Knowledge of Hebrew and previous Torah study are not required.  The Spring Session of this class will begin on Thursday, March 3 and run through May 5.  Check our calendar listings for March for more information.

$20 per class

This class is part of our Morris Kaplan Scholar in Residence Program

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January 2016
Sunday, January 31 at 3 pm

In Conversation: Letty, Robin and Abigail Pogrebin

One mother, two daughters, three writers.  Join activist and author Letty Cottin Pogrebin, her daughters author Abigail Pogrebin and New York Times writer Robin Pogrebin for a conversation about work, family and Jewish identity. This event is moderated by Annie Polland, Senior Vice President of Education & Programs at the Tenement Museum.

$18 adults; $15 students/seniors; includes Museum admission

Co-sponsored with Hadassah-Brooklyn Region, Hadassah-New York Region, and the Jewish Women's Archive.

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Wednesday, January 27 at 1 pm

Treasures from the Archives Tour

On the last Wednesday of each month we will present special synagogue tours.  This month, see rarely displayed Judaica and artifacts from the Museum’s collection on this behind-the-scenes tour of the synagogue.

$12 adults; $10 students/seniors, includes Museum admission

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Thursdays, 11 am to 12:30 pm

Not Just the Weekly Torah Portion with Dr. Regina Stein

Bring your questions and opinions as we explore a variety of issues raised by the Torah portion each week.  Knowledge of Hebrew and previous Torah study are not required.  Class meets January 7, 14, 21, 28 and February 4, 11, 18 and 25.  The Spring Session will begin on March 3 and run through May.  Please see our calendar listings for March for more information.

$120 for the eight-session class; $20 per single class

This class is part of our Morris Kaplan Scholar in Residence Program

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Monday, January 18 from 1 pm to 2:30 pm

What’s Your Dream? Join us for Martin Luther King Jr. Day

  They dreamed of a better life in America. Martin Luther King, Jr. fought for justice and equal rights. The immigrants who built the Eldridge Street Synagogue travelled far to find freedom. With hard work and hope, their dreams slowly changed the country and the world. What’s your dream? This Martin Luther King Day, enjoy the beauty of this historic site as we read the award-winning story by Kobi Yamada, What Do You Do With An Idea? and make a mural inspired by Martin Luther King’s ideas, his famous speech … and our own dreams.

This event is free. For ages 4-11 and their families.

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December 20152015
Tuesday, December 29 at 1 pm

Secrets of the Archives

Join the Museum’s archivist as she shares favorite, rarely displayed Judaica and early congregational artifacts from the Museum’s collection on this special tour of the synagogue.

$12 adults; $10 students/seniors; includes Museum admission

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Monday, December 28 at 1 pm

Beyond the Facade Architecture Tour

Discover the synagogue’s most spectacular and unusual features.  Learn about its authentic restoration, and get the behind-the-scenes story about the sanctuary’s newest element, a stained glass window by Kiki Smith and Deborah Gans.

This is a free event.

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Friday, December 25, at 11 am

Klez for Kids – Tickets available at the door

Sing, dance and learn Yiddish at our annual family concert.  Clarinetist Greg Wall and his band Klezmerfest lead the audience on a musical tour of Eastern European Jewish culture ending with a joyful audience-enacted shtetl wedding. After 10 am on December 25, you can purchase tickets at the door.

$12 adults; $10 students and seniors; $8 children 3-15; children under 3 are free

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Thursday, December 24, 1 pm

Lower East Side Hot Cider Walking Tour

A Yiddish newspaper building.  An early cinema.  A former mikvah and red light district.  Explore Jewish immigrant landmarks of the Lower East Side, then warm up inside our glorious sanctuary with hot cider and neighborhood treats.

$25 per person; includes Museum admission

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Sunday, December 20, at 3 pm

Debut Concert – Book of Questions

Leah Falk (text) and Joshua Morris (music), have created a remarkable song cycle inspired by ethnographer and playwright S. Ansky’s classic study of Jewish life in the Pale of Settlement in the early 20th century. Morris has set to music Falk’s adaptation of An-sky’s original questions, spoken by an An-sky like ethnographer character and a “child ethnographer” who embellishes and alters them.  This new work, “Book of Questions,” will be performed by Jonathan Estabrooks (baritone), Margaret Dudley (soprano), Stuart Breczinski (oboe), Martha Cargo (flute), and Hannah Levinson (viola).  This modern classical piece explores the search for two versions of lost Jewish communal life: one partly recoverable through research and one that remains hidden, accessible only through imagination and story.  Book of Questions is supported by Asylum Arts.

$20 adults; $15 students and seniors

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Thursdays, 11 am to 12:30 pm December 17

Not Just the Weekly Torah Portion with Dr. Regina Stein

Bring your questions and opinions as we explore a variety of questions and issues raised by the Torah portion (parashat hashavuah) each week. Knowledge of Hebrew and previous Torah study are NOT required.

$15 per class; $90 for all 7 classes

This class is part of our Morris Kaplan Scholar in Residence Program

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Special Thanks

The Museum's educational and cultural programs are supported, in part, with grants provided by 180 Varick Street, The David Berg Foundation, Bloomberg, The Brenner Family Foundation, Elias A. Cohen Foundation, Charles Cohn Foundation, The Edouard Foundation, Mitzi & Warren Eisenberg Family Foundation, Epstein Teicher Philanthropies Foundation, The David Geffen Foundation, The Goos Family, Marc Haas Foundation, Institute of Museum and Library Services, Jewish Community Youth Foundation, Eugene Lang Foundation, The Blanche and Irving Laurie Foundation, Alice Lawrence Foundation, Marta Joe Lawrence Charitable Trust, The Samuel M. Levy Family Foundation, Lucius N. Littauer Foundation, The Loeb Family- Third Point Foundation, Mort Mandel Philanthropic Trust, Manhattan Borough President's Office - Borough Needs, NYC & Co. Foundation/MBPO Cultural Tourism, Sun Hill Foundation, Newmark Grubb Knight Frank, New York City Council, The Honorable Margaret Chin, New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in Partnership with the City Council, New York City Department for the Aging, NYC Gives (Municipal Employee Giving Campaign- NYC), NYC Gives (Federal Employee Giving Campaign - NYC), New York State Council on the Arts, Leo Rosner Foundation, Charles and Mildred Schnurmacher Foundation, Inc., Michael Tuch Foundation, Lise & Jeffrey Wilks Family Foundation in memory of Jerry and Emily Spiegel, Y.H. Mirzoeff & Sons Foundation, Inc., and Valley National Bank.